Archive for January, 2010

  • The Joy of… Code Review (part 2)

    on Jan 28, 10 • by Gwyn Fisher • with 1 Comment

    The Joy of… Code Review (part 2)

    Part II – Joy is the word… OK, so Grease is really the word, but it didn’t fit my theme, gimme a break… Anyway, back on topic, since Joy of code review – part one of this series was published last year we’ve seen our new code review product in action in a variety of customer and prospect situations, and much like the eponymous hair product in the musical mentioned above, what we thought of as an interesting twist on an existing paradigm has turned into a bit of a barn burner. I refer, in

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  • Software metrics for measuring quality

    on Jan 26, 10 • by Alen Zukich • with 2 Comments

    How do you measure your software?  There are simple metrics that help with quality, such as keeping track of the number of bugs or security vulnerabilities in your system.  Trending these metrics is a no-brainer. When trending is in place, action can be taken because everyone knows 6 security vulnerabilities is worse than 5.  But what about other types of software metrics (and there are many)?  Have you ever heard of a maintainability metric? Halstead program volume? McCabe cyclomatic complexity?  Coupling/Cohesion?  The question becomes what do you do with these metrics and are they valuable

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  • Limping through agile

    on Jan 21, 10 • by Patti Murphy • with 2 Comments

    Limping through agile

    I’m a technical writer who’s a big picture kind of person and that means agile development is sheer torture for me. Going into my second agile project, I thought I would be able to go with the “flow” a bit more. I was wrong. But, it’s important to point out that our documentation team hit all of our deadlines for new features, while substantially rewriting our help set and moving it to a wiki. I’m pleased with the outcome, but the trip was not pleasant. This will be my first post in a series about

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  • Going Agile Part 4 – Iteration 1: The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly

    on Jan 19, 10 • by Todd Landry • with 1 Comment

    Going Agile Part 4 – Iteration 1: The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly

    I just couldn’t resist using the classic spaghetti Western as the title for this installment of my Going Agile series because it a) it was an awesome movie, and b) it truly sums up that 1st iteration of ours. My last post was all about the 1st iteration planning meeting, and how it was such an exciting and productive time for our team. We came out of that meeting a little weary, but extremely motivated to get to work. We were also just a tad naive. The next 2 weeks were a roller coaster as

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  • Aerospace IT Yearbook: Bugs in the Air

    on Jan 15, 10 • by Lynn Gayowski • with No Comments

    Embedded software is a ubiquitous presence onboard aircraft today. Just as software has become a key element in everything from consumer vehicles to household appliances, it is also critical to aircraft control. Beyond mission-critical avionics systems, software is also increasingly present in commercial aircraft galley equipment, passenger onboard entertainment systems and, more recently, wi-fi networks for passengers. With The use of software growing in both critical and non-critical aircraft systems, software quality and security are vital to the safety and reliability of the commercial aircraft industry. This article explores the challenges that widespread use and

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  • Going Agile Part 3 – The 1st Iteration Planning Meeting

    on Jan 14, 10 • by Todd Landry • with No Comments

    Going Agile Part 3 – The 1st Iteration Planning Meeting

    Now that the New Year is upon us, I thought it would be a good time to add another chapter to my Going Agile series. My last entry left off at the point where we had prepared our backlog, created team rules and defined “Done”. Now we were ready for our first Iteration Planning meeting. In our “team room” we had all the essentials in place for this meeting: stacks of color-coded cards (for capturing the various to do’s, or tasks), pens and highlighters, our Scrum board (with pins) to stick our tasks onto, and

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  • Compiler warnings, Coding standards, Code quality…oh my! (Part 3)

    on Jan 12, 10 • by Alen Zukich • with No Comments

    In my previous blog post, we talked about the value of compiler warnings and reasons to have source code analysis. Now, I’d like to get into the value of coding standards and touch on how you can fit this altogether. Coding standards are a set of rules or guidelines usually created as part of an industry. The goal is simple, provide guidelines, so you can create better code and increase your code quality. Probably the most common coding standard I run into is called MISRA C. This is a standard created for C code in

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  • Klocwork Closes Successful 2009

    on Jan 6, 10 • by Meranda Powers • with No Comments

    Year highlighted by introduction of new product family and continued business growth BURLINGTON, Mass. — Jan 06, 2010 — Klocwork, Inc., the global leader in automated source code analysis solutions for improving developer productivity, today marked the close of a successful 2009 business year, fueled by innovative product portfolio expansion, strong customer growth, and the expansion of the company’s global partner network. "We went into 2009 with the goal of accelerating our commitment to deliver more value to the professional developer’s desktop with new, innovative tools available through more channels," said Mike Laginski, chief executive

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  • Developing Software for Medical Devices – Interview with SterlingTech

    on Jan 5, 10 • by Brendan Harrison • with 8 Comments

    Developing Software for Medical Devices – Interview with SterlingTech

    I had a chance to speak with Bruce Swope, the VP of Engineering at SterlingTech, an ISO13485 Registered full-service medical device software organization offering software development and validation services. SterlingTech has developed software for an array of medical products including implantable devices as well as external support and monitoring equipment. Their team has worked on Class I, II, and III devices that resulted in successful FDA 510(k)s, PMAs, and CE submissions. Bruce has extensive experience in medical device software development and he is an expert in leading Class III medical software products to commercial release. His depth

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