In standards we unite, in agile we diverge

In standards we unite, in agile we diverge

on Jan 11, 11 • by Patti Murphy • with 2 Comments

What comes first—the process or the tool? Yes. Any tool worth its salt should integrate into existing processes and tools. What’s interesting and informative is seeing the similarities and differences in how the same tool is applied in different organizations, across continents and oceans. The emphasis on quality...

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What comes first—the process or the tool?

Yes.

Any tool worth its salt should integrate into existing processes and tools.

What’s interesting and informative is seeing the similarities and differences in how the same tool is applied in different organizations, across continents and oceans.

The emphasis on quality unites everyone, but the level to which agile is adopted is what makes static analysis markets different.

No one knows this more than Mark Grice, Klocwork Director and Manager of the International Reseller/Partner Network, and Steve Howard, head of Partner Support in Europe.

Trying to talk to these guys at the same time is a challenge. Mark’s work takes him all over Asia, but I managed to pinpoint him in Japan; Steve spends most of his time traveling across Europe, but was at his home base in England—for a time, anyway.

Same difference

The European and Asian markets are all singing from the same song book when it comes to coding standards.

MISRA is very appealing here in Europe, particularly on the developer desktop,” Steve says.

“There’s a strong focus on quality here,” Mark says about his Asian market. While MISRA is “somewhat appealing,” Mark says he gets asked about Embedded System development exemplar Reference Series (ESxR) quite a lot. It’s a coding standard similar to MISRA in that it’s aimed at embedded system development, but its adoption is more Japan-centric. For more information, see ESxR at Information-technology Promotion Agency, Japan (IPA).

Steve explains  that the ability to extend checkers to suit the needs of specific organizations is of keen interest to customers in his bailiwick.
“Sometimes organizations want to enforce their own naming conventions or code constructions, and the extensibility tools provide a very quick and effective way to accomplish that,” he says.

Difference

The developer desktop illustrates the great agile divide.

“I’d say Europe is a little bit behind North America in its adoption of agile, but there’s still the same requirement for developer productivity and speed,” Steve says.

For that reason, he sees more opportunity to penetrate the European market with a static code analysis tool for the developer desktop. The growing interest in agile in Europe gives him an increasingly receptive audience.

Japan is a bit different on this score from the rest of Asia.

Quality is seen as the purview of testing teams, and not development. That means that there’s a huge focus on quality at the end of the development life cycle, rather than the beginning, Mark explains.

Desktop source code analysis tools are a harder sell in Japan, but that may change as agile processes trickle in.

And there you have it, a quick peek at a couple of our markets.

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