He crossed the line–testing to development

He crossed the line–testing to development

on Jul 12, 11 • by Patti Murphy • with 1 Comment

Instead of fomenting dissent (that barely exists) in a brazen attempt to boost readership, I’m changing tactics to look at ways in which testing and development are complementary, beyond their common goal of releasing quality software products. What can I say? After my previous post, How developers drive...

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Instead of fomenting dissent (that barely exists) in a brazen attempt to boost readership, I’m changing tactics to look at ways in which testing and development are complementary, beyond their common goal of releasing quality software products.

What can I say? After my previous post, How developers drive testers nuts–let’s count the ways, I’m clearly getting less edgy.

I approached our newest addition to the Klocwork development team, Michail Greshishchev. While he’s a new full-timer, Greshishchev is not a new face around here.

The recent Carleton University engineering graduate did two co-op terms here–one in professional services and the other in testing.

So I asked Greshishchev how his stint in testing affected his development. Here’s exactly what he said:

  1. Writing short, efficient unit tests comes naturally after dealing with mammoth testing frameworks. Most of the code I write are tests – the techniques and skills I’ve learned in testing are fully applicable to development.
  2. Developers have no idea how to execute a test in our automated test system (I don’t blame them–the test machine is a large, well-oiled beast distributed over dozens of operating environments). Having the knowledge to run test team tests on developer builds means I don’t need to wait for nightly build test results to address issues. More importantly, I can add my own tests to the test team’s automated test system.
  3. It’s common for a developer to request more information about a tester’s problem report. My experience with the test team allows me to access the information on test machines myself, saving time for everyone.
  4. The test report pages actually make sense. This allows me to investigate test failures in the nightly build before a tester comes to my desk to tell me I broke something.

His experience as part of the test team has been win-win for him and his colleagues. Testing and development sound like allies, don’t they? Well, as much as werewolves and vampires can be allies, I suppose. And he was such a nice guy too, but the change is upon him.

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One Response to He crossed the line–testing to development

  1. Tom Mariner says:

    Aha, a grown up in the room! One of the most important development issues in the past decade is not morphing to managed code or object orientation, it’s the methodology. And the agile methods of testing integration is wicked important. A part of that methodology is that we learn and improve our products and processes every day.

    So here’s the question for all of us: learning from Mr. Greshishchev’s experience, why don’t we consider “time in the barrel” of automated testing a prerequisite for a super level of developer?

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