Posts Tagged ‘Java’

  • Bringing up your Android Dev Environment from Scratch

    on Jan 4, 13 • by Eric Cloninger • with 2 Comments

    Bringing up your Android Dev Environment from Scratch

    As (bad) luck would have it, the solid state drive with my Linux partition died the week of Thanksgiving. I have backups of the data, so I haven’t lost anything other than time. I used that partition for testing and building the Android platform sources and that’s about it. It’s aggravating to lose the SSD, but not devastating. All my important files are stored elsewhere. After the hard drive died, I needed to get the latest code for Android 4.2.1 that came out in late November. Instead of going through the hassles of installing a

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  • Another resource leak

    on Mar 1, 11 • by Alen Zukich • with 1 Comment

    It happened again.  For what seems like the 100th time, someone reports to me that they are seeing a number of false positive reports on the resource leak checker.  For those not familiar with a resource leak, take a look at a previous post.  Although resource leaks apply across most languages, the place where this question keeps coming  up seems to always be in Java or C# code.  My last query came from Java code, so we will use that as an example.  Here was a report where the FileInputSteam is not closed on exit

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  • A new Android freshly baked!

    on Dec 23, 10 • by Vahid Jozi • with 1 Comment

    A new Android freshly baked!

    In my last post, I talked about some of the reasons why I started developing Android apps. The new Android 2.3 Gingerbread is even better than Froyo. I’m talking about a whole new Nerdy and the Droid factory. With Gingerbread released and rolled out on the new flagship phone, the Google Nexus S, the developers’ wait is over. Some of the new features and functionalities baked within Gingerbread are: 1.    More power under the hood My Nexus One lasts me about a day running Froyo. Android is now way smarter in managing its electrons with

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  • Why Android is such a developer magnet!

    on Dec 21, 10 • by Vahid Jozi • with No Comments

    Why Android is such a developer magnet!

    The open-source, Linux-based and hardware-independent Android mobile OS, with the new Android 2.3 Gingerbread release is giving mobile developers a whole new ball court to play in. Android is the fastest growing mobile OS among its competitors and with its share in the Smartphone user market growing, Android is attracting more and more enthusiastic developers. Being a Java developer I jumped right into Android development about a year ago. There is a whole list of reasons why I chose to develop Android apps over other platforms and here are some of them: 1.    Low development

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  • Android apps buggy?

    on Dec 22, 09 • by Alen Zukich • with 6 Comments

    We are starting to see a large amount of Android phones such as the Droid and Xperia X10 (see a review here) and the (soon-to-be-released) first Google phone, Nexus One. With this, expect the number of apps to increase significantly. So with the increased number of apps, do these developers have the right tools to find and fix bugs? Take a look at the leader of phone applications-iPhone. There have been several posts (here and here) that recommend using the Clang static analyzer. Apple has taken it one step further, apparently rejecting iPhone apps that

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  • Top 5 Java quality bugs

    on Oct 13, 09 • by Alen Zukich • with No Comments

    In a previous posts I reviewed the Top 5 C/C++ and Top 5 C# quality bugs that I that I see time and time again looking at customer code. I wrote my Java Top 5 with an embedded programming focus and the folks at www.embedded.com decided to publish it on their site. Here’s a snippet below and the full Top 5 Java bugs article can be found here. While C dominates as the programming language of choice for embedded development, the use of Java is definitely on the rise. In fact, according to a recent

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  • Findbugs not recognizing exceptions? Java static analysis

    on May 4, 09 • by Alen Zukich • with 1 Comment

    We’ve posted previously on some of the differences between Findbugs’ open source Java analysis and commercial Java static analysis tools, specifically on the JSR-305 specification and source code versus byte code analysis topics. Due to these differences, many Java shops will use a commercial Java static analysis tool in conjunction with Findbugs to make sure they’re getting as complete issue detection as possible. One area that’s been discussed previously is the ability to identify situations of possible null pointer dereference. This peaked my interest and led me to do some benchmarking against a few open

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  • JSR 305: a silver bullet or not a bullet at all?

    on Mar 30, 09 • by Mikhail Ksenzov • with 9 Comments

    JSR-305 is a Java Specification Request intended to improve the effectiveness of static analysis tools operating in Java 5+ environments. The idea here is that one can use special purpose annotations in order to provide static analysis tools with hints regarding the behaviour and side effects of methods. An example of such annotations can be found in the presentation ‘Annotations for Software Defect Detection’ by William Pugh, who is masterminding the whole spec. Here we go: 1: void test() { 2:    if (spec != null) fFragments.add(spec); 3:    if (isComplete(spec)) fPreferences.add(spec); 4: } 6: 5: boolean isComplete(AnnotationPreferences spec)

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  • Java source code vs bytecode analysis

    on Jan 6, 09 • by Alen Zukich • with No Comments

    David posted an interesting discussion on the usage of static analysis tools by developers to find security vulnerabilities.  As always the discussion with static analysis tools lean towards the false positive and false negative discussion.  But also David mentions their results are sometimes difficult to understand.   This is one of the reasons Klocwork switched from a bytecode analysis tool for Java to a source code analysis tool.  As both have their advantages and disadvantages (and I admit I’m very biased here) we have certainly found that we have been able to reduce our false positive

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  • ISV software quality; tortology or oxymoron…

    on Dec 10, 08 • by Gwyn Fisher • with No Comments

    It’s kind of bizarre, but in my pre-Klocwork experience of running ISV development groups, from small teams to global enterprises, it never struck me as wrong that we would routinely ship software containing critical bugs. We knew we were doing it. We knew, on some abstract underground never-to-be-admitted layer of our deepest darkest souls, that this was a “bad thing.” But mostly, we knew that when somebody found a bug we could just send them a patch. And what’s more, we knew that customers expected this behavior. We got requests to “send us a patch

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